Murphy’s Military Laws


 

  • No battle plan ever survives contact with the enemy.
  • Friendly fire ain’t 
  • The most dangerous thing in the combat zone is an officer with a map.

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  • The problem with taking the easy way out is that the
  • enemy has already mined it .
  • The buddy system is essential to your survival; it gives the enemy somebody else to shoot at.
  • The further you are in advance of your own positions, the more likely your artillery will shoot short.
  • Incoming fire has the right of way.
  • If your advance is going well, you are walking into an ambush.
  • The quartermaster has only two sizes, too large and too small.
  • If you really need an officer in a hurry, take a nap.
  • The only time suppressive fire works is when it is used on abandoned positions.
  • The only thing more accurate than incoming enemy fire is incoming friendly fire.
  • There is nothing more satisfying that having someone take a shot at you, and miss.
  • Don’t be conspicuous. In the combat zone, it draws fire. Out of the combat zone, it draws sergeants.
  • If your sergeant can see you, so can the enemy.

[Source]

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The Top 10 Phrases Your First Sergeant Is Saying Wrong


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[We’ve] all heard these phrases, but it may have taken us a while to decipher them.
NSFW
Most of you have numerous memories of early mornings and late evenings spent standing at parade rest or in a “school circle” for what felt like an eternity — often in blazing heat or freezing precipitation — to hear the nerve-racking voice of your first sergeant. (For you Navy/Coast Guard folks, that would be a senior chief. For my Air Force brethren, I have no idea.  A “Senior Grand Webelo 3rd Class,” or something?). His meandering oratory always rife with twists and turns, the tone jumping from accusatory to encouraging to humorous with no warning or discernable sense to those who heard it. And at the end of each such speech, whether daily, weekly, or otherwise, the majority of you probably had two questions in your head: “Why is that officer over there laughing so hard? And what the hell did first sergeant actually say?”

Read more

Monday MILspeak


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Here’s another list of lingo used by our military. Some of the words/phrases have endured  history but the post 911 veterans have made their mark on the language by adding a few more while revising some that were a little outdated.  I  never get tired of these, Enjoy! 

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.  

Funny Military Pictures (10)  Physical and moral courage and the confidence they create are essential warrior virtues. But God—or the first sergeant—help the fake macho and especially the “REMF,” “fobbit,” or “suit” who talks the talk but hasn’t walked the walk.

 NSFW

  1. COP: Combat Outpost. A small base, usually housing between 40 and 150 soldiers, often in a particularly hostile area. Life at a COP is often austere and demanding, with every soldier responsible for both guard duty and patrolling.

  2. DFAC: (pronounced dee-fack) Dining Facility, aka Chow Hall. Where soldiers eat. At larger bases the meals are served by contracted employees, often from Bangladesh or India. These employees are called TCNs, or Third-Country Nationals. Read more

18 Terms Only Soldiers Will Understand


Soldier lingo has a tendency to reference things that only exist in the Army. Here are some terms outsiders probably don’t know.

  • Private News Network: The rumor mill or soldier gossip.
  • Grab some real estate: This is a command to get on the ground and start exercising, usually with pushups. It’s issued as a punishment for a minor infraction. The command can also be stated as, “beat your face.”

Read more

Military MILspeak


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Today is #ThrowbackThursday and I thought I’d share posts that I’ve previously published. My Military Milspeak always went over well, so I thought I’d start off with this! Enjoy!

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.  

Funny Military Pictures (10)  Physical and moral courage and the confidence they create are essential warrior virtues. But God—or the first sergeant—help the fake macho and especially the “REMF,” “fobbit,” or “suit” who talks the talk but hasn’t walked the walk.

 NSFW.

  1.    Habeeb (U.S.) A general term for Iraqis during the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. From Arabic for ‘friend.’ Somewhat pejorative or dismissive.
  2. Habeebatee (U.S.) A term for an attractive Arab female. Somewhat pejorative or dismissive and frowned upon given current events.
    Read more

41 Phrases Only People In The Military Will Understand


US Marine Corps

#BusinessInsider

Every region of the US has its own unique phrases, but they have nothing on the complex lexicon shared by people in the military.

Our service members already set themselves apart by speaking in acronyms like, “I was on the FOB when the IDF hit, so I radioed the TOC.” Aside from their acronyms, members of the military also have their own special phrases that caught our attention. Read more

Military Mumbo Jumbo: MILspeak-10 October 2014


It’s been awhile…

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.

NSFW

CAB: Combat Action Badge (ARMY). Developed in response to number of soldiers performing in a infantry or infantry-like position under the same conditions as the infantry, but do not hold an infantry MOS Read more

What Did He Say?


Lol, I thought they were legit at first…until I read the some of the captions. Haha, “Having a hard time seeing without glasses…”   Enjoy a little humor on this Labor Day holiday. 

🙂

NOTE: language NSFW

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Here are what they REALLY mean. 

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Midweek MIL-speak: 19 August 2014


Language NSFW

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage. Read more

BRIT-speak 12


Here’s the eleventh  installment from “The Best of British.” I’ve heard maybe a handful of these terms my entire life. No wonder my friends across the pond chuckle at me; we essentially speak the same the same language but geography has played a big part in the diversity there is between the two counties. Enjoy! Read more

Midweek MIL-speak: 3 July 2014


 

NOTE: NSFW; language may be offensive to some. 

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.

**
Vandoo or Van Doo
(Canada) Nickname for the Royal 22e Régiment, based on the English perception of the French pronunciation for “22” (Vingt-deux); said to have lead the Germans to believe the regiment was named Voodoo Regiment during WWI or WWII. Read more

BRIT-speak 11


Here’s the eleventh  installment from “The Best of British.” I’ve heard maybe a handful of these terms my entire life. No wonder my friends across the pond chuckle at me; we essentially speak the same the same language but geography has played a big part in the diversity there is between the two counties. Enjoy!  

language is NSFW

  • Sod all – If you are a waiter in America and you serve a family of Brits, the tip is likely to be sod all or as you would call it – nothing. Because we don’t know about tipping.

    Sod’s law – This is another name for Murphy’s law – whatever can go wrong, will go wrong.

    Sorted – When you have fixed a problem and someone asks how it is going you might say “sorted”. It’s also popular these days to say “get it sorted” when you are telling someone to get on with the job.

    Speciality – This is another one where you chaps drop your “I”. when I first sawspecialty written down in the US I thought it was a mistake. But no! We love our I’s!

    Spend a penny – To spend a penny is to go to the bathroom. It is a very old fashioned expression that still exists today. It comes from the fact that in ladies loos you used to operate the door by inserting an old penny.

    Splash out – If you splash out on something – it means you throw your senses out the window, get out your credit card and spend far too much money. You might splash out on a new car or even on a good meal.

    Squidgy – A chocolate cream cake would be squidgey. It means to be soft and, well, squidgey!

    Squiffy – This means you are feeling a little drunk. Some people also use it to mean that something has gone wrong.

    Starkers – Avoid being seen starkers when visiting England. It means stark naked.

    Stiffy – Yet another word for erection.

    Stone the crows – This is an old expression with the same meaning as “cor blimey”.

    Stonker – This means something is huge. Looking at the burger you might say “blimeywhat a stonker”. It is also used to refer to an erection! Clearly English modesty is a myth!

    Stonking – This weird word means huge. You might say “what a stonking great burger” if you were in an American burger joint.

    Strop – If someone is sulking or being particularly miserable you would say they are being stroppy or that they have a strop on. I heard an old man on the train tell his wife to stop being a stroppy cow.

    Stuff – A recent headline in the New Statesman read “stuff the millennium”. Using stuff in this context is a polite way of saying “f*** the millennium”. Who cares! Stuff it! You can also say “stuff him” or “stuff her” meaning they can sod off.

    Suss – If you heard someone saying they had you sussed they would mean that they had you figured out! If you were going to suss out something it would mean the same thing.

    Sweet fanny adams – This means nothing or sod all. It is a substitute for “sweet f*** all”. It is also shortened further to “sweet F A”.

    Swotting – Swotting means to study hard, the same as cram does. Before exams we used to swot, not that it made any difference to some of us. If you swotted all the time, you would be called a swot – which is not a term of endearment!

    Ta – We said “ta” as kids in Liverpool for years before we even knew it was short forthanks.

    Table – We use this word in exactly the opposite way. To us a motion is tabled when it is brought to the table, or suggested for consideration. You table a motion when it is left for a later date.

    Taking the biscuit – If something really takes the biscuit, it means it out-doeseverything else and cannot be bettered. Some places in America they said takes the cake.

    Taking the mickey – See taking the piss. Variations include “taking the mick” and “taking the Michael”.

    Taking the piss – One of the things Americans find hardest about the Brits is our sense of humour. It is obviously different and is mainly based on irony, sarcasm and an in-built desire to “take the piss”. This has nothing to do with urine, but simply meansmaking fun of someone.

    Talent – Talent is the same as totty. Checking out the talent means looking for the sexy young girls (or boys I suppose).

    Tara – Pronounced “churar”, this is another word for cheerio or goodbye. Cilla Black, ascouse TV presenter has probably done most to promote the use of this word as she says it all the time on her programmes.

 

Monday MIL-speak: 9 June 2014


NOTE: NSFW; language may be offensive to some. 

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.

/
Tooth Fairy
(U.S. Navy) a.k.a. “Fang Fairy”. Slang for a Sailor in the DT (Dental Technician) rating. Self-explanatory.
Top
(U.S. Army and Marines) The First Sergeant or Master Sergeant (U.S. Marine Corps), senior enlisted man at company level.
Tore Up
(U.S. Army) A person, object or situation in disarray. Also, used as “Tore up from the floor up.”
Track Pad
1. (Canada) boil-in-the-bag omelet from ration pack. Similar in size and (reputedly) texture to the rubber pads fitted to AV tracks 2. (Canada) the rubber pad insert fitted to steel armored vehicle tracks to prevent damage to asphalt or concrete road surfaces.
Travelling Around Drunk
(U.S. Navy) On detached duty, officially termed “Temporary Additional Duty”.
Tread
(U.S. Army) An officer or NCO, especially one seen as oppressing enlisted personnel.

Trench monkey
(U.S.) A member of the Army infantry. Mostly used in a derogatory way by members of other services.
trigger puller
(U.S.) A Soldier or Marine who is regularly involved in actual combat. I wouldn’t want to be out in the shit without the trigger pullers with U.S..
Triple Threat
(U.S. Army) A Soldier who has the Special Forces Tab, Ranger School Tab, and Airborne Tab (worn as an integral part of the SSI) and wears all three tabs on his uniform. Also known as the “Tower of Power” due to the extreme difficulty involved in the military schools, and the “Triple Canopy” as a reference to parachuting.
TROBA
(U.S. Air Force) When ABORT is improbable, but desired. Sometimes TROBA dances are initiated, to increase the chance of an aircraft RTB.
Tube stroker
A common nickname given to mortar-men by rival units to playfully mock the mortar-man job.
Turd Chaser
(U.S. Navy) Slang for a Sailor in the HT (Hull Technician) rating. So named because most of their job aboard ship consists of fixing sewage pipe blockages.
Turd Herder
(U.S. Navy) Slang for a Seabee in the UT (Utilitiesman) rating, tasked with building and maintaining camp water supply and sanitation systems. Turd herders only need to know three things – hot on the left, shit flows downhill, and quittin’ time is 1500.

Turtle fuck(ing)
(U.S. Marine Corps) Striking a Marine on his helmet with another helmet. The clunking of the two Kevlar helmets sounds like two empty shells hitting. Sometimes done deliberately among friends, but often as a joke to an unsuspecting trooper.
Twenty-nine Stumps
(U.S. Marine Corps) Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twenty-nine Palms, California. Often simply referred to as “the Stumps.”
Two beer queer
(U.S.) A man who can’t handle his liquor. Implies that he’s ready to perform homosexual favors after his second beer.
Two digit midget
(U.S.) A G.I. who has less than 100 days ‘in country’ left before they rotate back to the U.S.A and/or before discharge. Coined during Vietnam War. See “short”.

Uniform
(U.S.) NATO phonetic alphabet for the letter ‘U’. Stands for “Unidentified”. Can be an unidentified object, person, vehicle, etc. Example: “We have a Uniform dead ahead, someone move in and check it.”
(U.K.) Means “Undercover”, usually means a camouflaged object, vehicle or person, or a covert operative behind enemy lines. Can jokingly refer to an enemy mistakenly firing at his own people. Example: “We gotta’ retrieve that Uniform without them noticing.”, or “Look at that Uniform there, is he blind?!”
Un-ass
(U.S. Army) Meaning to get out of an area. As in, “Un-ass my AO.” Originally Used to mean simply, “Get off your butt.” Also, to dismount rapidly from a vehicle, “We un-assed the APC.”
Uncle Sam’s Canoe Club
(U.S.) The United States Navy.
Uncle Sam’s Confused Group
(U.S.) The United States U.S. Coast Guard.
Uncle Sam’s Misguided Children
(U.S.) Ironic term for the United States Marine Corps. Sometimes also the “University of Science, Music, and Culture”, “U Suckers Missed Christmas”, and “U Signed the Motherfuckin’ Contract”.
Unfuck
(U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps) To bring something or someone into proper order and accord with SOP.
Unsat
(U.S.) Unsatisfactory.
US
(U.K., WWII, until 1944) Un Serviceable. Since this acronym was also used to identify a major ally, this particular usage became politically unacceptable but unofficially continued in use.

Ω Source

More: Murphy’s Laws of Combat


Here are some additional  “Laws” I found via Google image search. There’s a page missing and I’ve noticed a few repeats from my first post of Murphy’s Laws of Combat along with quite a few new ones. Enjoy!

Monday MIL-speak: 5 May, 2014


Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.

TA-50
(U.S. Army) Issued “Go to War” gear used by Soldiers during training or actual combat.
TA-100
(U.S. Army) Refers to overwhelming amount of TA-50. For example, “At Ft. Stewart, we got issued TA-100. It’s twice as much.” Read more