Listen to Julius Howell, a General of the Confederate Army’s Calvary Unit. He joined his fellow Southerners at the age of 16 and gave this radio address in 1948 at the age of 91. He recalls his memory of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln and the *(real)  reason there was a Civil War to begin with.

 

*contrary in part to what our history books claim it was fought for.

 

 

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Watch “Civil War Ballooning: President Lincoln’s Air Force” on YouTube


Civil War Ballooning: President Lincoln’s Air Force: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL45AF5AB8BB4E8E03

This is a Playlist with eight (8) videos about our 16th President’s Air Force! Watch them at your leisure. Enjoy! 

Watch “Footage of Civil War Veterans at 50yr Anniversary in 1913 & 75yr Anniversary in 1938”


This treasure was buried under decades of American history @ the Library of Congress. Here is rare footage of our Civil War veterans. Enjoy

Reunion: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 1913


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When a reunion for Civil War veterans was proposed (North AND South together on the same battlefield they met on in war) it wasn’t met with much enthusiasm from either side, but in the end the men put their differences and pride aside, met their former adversaries for a day of remembering and I’m sure healing. The reunions became an annual event with 1913 kicking off the tradition, it lasted until 1938.

Above image:
Battle of Gettsburg veterans. The picture was taken in 1913, at a reunion held on the battlefield. The man sitting on the rocks is a Confederate soldier, and the man standing is a Union soldier.

How Recruitment Posters Used Pay, Patriotism, And Sex Appeal To Bolster The Ranks


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Civil War poster

Unlike the robust recruitment efforts of World War I and World War II, recruitment today is more focused on maintaining a standing military. As such there’s more emphasis on character, skill, and career development instead of a call to arms in response to a specific threat.
Read more

Image of the Day: 28 March 2016


An original photograph of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Officers of 50th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry.  It was created in 1865.

#Stop22ADay

Gettysburg: The Wheat Field


A battle that lasted three hours, the wheat field in Gettysburg claimed thousands of American Lives.

#Stop22ADay

Image of the Day: 17 November 2015


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Confederate Soldiers in America's Civil War

Although the North won the American Civil War, these soldiers are nonetheless, Americans and a very important part of our history.

Image of the Day: 13 October 2015


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American Civil War, Confederate soldiers

Confederate volunteers, 1861

#Stop22ADay ⚓

Image of the Day: 4 October 2015


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American Civil War

Gettysburg-    Troops marching in Gettysburg the day of Lincolns address.     November 1863.

#Stop22ADay ⚓

Abraham Lincoln’s Speech To The 166th Ohio Regiment Shows His Admiration For The Common Soldier


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Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress

Lincoln’s speech to the 166th Ohio Regiment shows his capacity for empathy toward the everyday soldier.

On August 22, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln addressed the Union soldiers of the 166th Ohio Regiment as they passed through Washington, D.C. It was three years into the Civil War and during this time Lincoln had gained a reputation for giving memorable speeches to Union troops.
Read more

Florida and The Civil War: A Short History


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By Dr. R. Boyd Murphree

Florida’s role in the American Civil War spanned the entire conflict. From the earliest days of secession in January 1861, when war threatened to break out in Pensacola, to the final surrender of Confederate forces in Florida in May 1865, Floridians experienced all aspects of the war that the South faced as a whole: economic hardship, naval blockade, internal dissension, battle, and final defeat. The purpose of this guide is to identify and describe the Civil War collections and publications available to researchers at the State Archives of Florida and the Florida Collection of the State Library. The following short history provides an overview of the Civil War in Florida and the service of Floridians in the war outside of the state. Read more

After 150 years, Confederate submarine’s hull again revealed


Conservator Virginie Ternisien works at removing the encrustation from the hull of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C., on Jan. 27, 2015. Scientists say that after six months of work, about 70 percent of the encrusted sand, silt and rust from the outside of the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship has been removed. Scientists hope that when the entire hull is revealed, it will provide the clues as to why the Hunley sank after sinking a Union blockade ship off Charleston, S.C., in 1864.
Conservator Virginie Ternisien works at removing the encrustation from the hull of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley at a conservation lab in North Charleston, S.C., on Jan. 27, 2015. Scientists say that after six months of work, about 70 percent of the encrusted sand, silt and rust from the outside of the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship has been removed. Scientists hope that when the entire hull is revealed, it will provide the clues as to why the Hunley sank after sinking a Union blockade ship off Charleston, S.C., in 1864.

Via MSN News

This was in my inbox today. Another great piece of history via a(n) US veteran.  They really look out for me–making sure I get these wonderful stories to share with you. Enjoy, This one is cool! 

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. — A century and a half after it sank and a decade and a half after it was raised, scientists are finally getting a look at the hull of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship.

What they find may finally solve the mystery of why the hand-cranked submarine sank during the Civil War. Read more

What The Civil War Teaches Us About Women In Combat


  • Marines and Sailors attending the Lioness Program, receive training in Al Asad, Iraq on various Improvised Explosive Devices being used to attack Coalition and Iraqi forces. Photo by Sgt James R. Richardson

The historical study of women soldiers in past conflicts, such as the Civil War, provides a compelling argument for women in combat.

Editor’s Note: Portions of this essay originally appeared in “The Women’s War: Separate Spheres and Women Soldiers in the American Civil War,” a culmination of the author’s undergraduate research. Read more

Civil War officer to receive Medal of Honor


- This undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society shows First Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing. WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, FILE — AP Photo
– This undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society shows First Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing. WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, FILE — AP Photo

The News Tribune

A Union Army officer who stood his ground during the Battle of Gettysburg and paid with his life is receiving the nation’s highest military honor from President Barack Obama.

Obama on Thursday was bestowing the Medal of Honor on 1st Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing, who was killed in July 1863 during the three-day battle near the Pennsylvania town. The battle often is described as the turning point of the Civil War. Read more