Roadside bomb kills US soldier in Afghanistan, coalition says


Roadside bomb kills US soldier 2016

A roadside bomb killed a US soldier in Helmand, a province in southern Afghanistan that has seen an upsurge in violence in recent weeks.

The bomb also wounded another US soldier and six Afghan soldiers, coalition forces said in a statement on Tuesday. The wounded soldier was in stable condition, the statement said. Read more

Watch: War and Peace 


What does it take to bring about peace? In TED Talks: War and Peace join host Baratunde Thurston to meet those who have experienced every aspect of war — fighters, journalists, psychologists, doctors and peacemakers — for a look at the impact of war and combat in our world. Learn how it affects every one of us in these extraordinary, passionate talks and performances from actor and veteran Adam Driver, who talks about his experience as a marine and how acting helped with his transition back to civilian life, journalist Sebastian Junger reflecting on PTSD after spending years reporting from war zones, author and humanitarian Samantha Nutt examining the proliferation and supply of small arms used to intimidate civilians in war-torn countries, Jamila Raqib, a peace activist and Executive Director of the Albert Einstein Institution who works on nonviolent solutions to some of the largest conflicts of the world, and activist and mother Christianne Boudreau conveying the emotional story of her son’s conversion to radical Islam and subsequent death while fighting for ISIS in Syria.
Along with a special performance from singer Rufus Wainwright, TED Talks: War and Peace also features a series of specially curated short films from award-winning filmmakers, including Bionic Soldier, which takes a look at the MIT Media Lab’s breakthrough advances in bionic limbs, providing greater mobility and new hope to those with physical disabilities; Talk of War, which weaves together different adult voices talking to kids about war; and All Roads Point Home, which follows Linda Singh, Maryland’s highest-ranking soldier, as she uses the skills she honed in her deployments to Afghanistan and Kosovo to keep the peace during a rioting crisis in Baltimore.

War is our creation; we sell it, spread it, and profit from it, so how can we build a future without war?

http://player.pbs.org/viralplayer/2365763232

New 2016 Veteran benefits


New 2016 Veteran benefits

To see if you qualify, follow the link below.

2016 veteran benefits 

Veterans Law Blog: New Rule Goes in Effect Today!


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Mural

This is an abridgment of today’s Veterans Law Blog (www.veteranslawblog.org) post by my good friend, Chris Attig (www.attiglawfirm.com):

The Veterans Law Blog just got word today that the criteria the VA uses to assign a 50% rating to VA Sleep Apnea Claims has just changed, effective April 18, 2016. Read more

8 Things In The Back Of Every Veteran’s Closet


There are just certain things that veterans never get rid of.
When you serve in the military, you inevitably collect a lot of memorabilia. By the time you separate or retire, you’ve basically got a closet full of military stuff. Some of it you just don’t need anymore — like sock garters … hopefully. But other things you’ll want to keep forever. Occasionally, veterans will make an “I love me” wall. Others just devote space for a box in the attic.

Whatever you do choose to do with your military stuff, here are eight things that veterans never throw out. Read more

Congress considers veteran suicide bills


Veterans advocates say there’s momentum in the battle against suicide with several bills pending in Congress, including one influenced by a grieving family in Coronado.

The legislation, which applies to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, addresses the higher suicide rate among female veterans and the mental health care needs of vets privy to classified material.

Read more

Gulf War Syndrome, Other Illnesses Among Veterans May Be Due To Toxic Environments

Gulf War Syndrome, Other Illnesses Among Veterans May Be Due To Toxic Environments

See below

Gulf War Illness
n Gulf War Illness


Read a first hand account of a Gulf veteran who has been living with this illness. She, like so many of our veterans  suffer with what seems to be no hope for treatment. Follow the link below 

Gulf War Syndrome, Other Illnesses Among Veterans May Be Due To Toxic Environments

Kevlar for the Mind: Recovering from traumatic brain injuries


Every time you turn on the TV or read the paper there seems to be a story about how tens of thousands of service members have suffered traumatic brain injuries during combat. There’s no doubt that tens if not hundreds of thousands of men and women are dealing with the aftereffects of this cruel and devastating consequence of war. Read more

VA undertakes depression, seasonal affective disorder amongst vets


Editor’s Note: This is the third in a three-part series of articles designed to generate awareness and provide resources for people suffering from Seasonal affective disorder and depression. Read more

Veterans of Iraq, Afghanistan Show Brain Changes Related to Explosion Exposure


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Our veterans need our voices!

I’m embedding another post that was shared to Google plus by a veteran.*

*FYI: The embedded posts I share from Google plus will always be from veterans and/or active duty military.

#Stop22ADay

Why suicide rate among veterans may be higher than 22 a day


Excerpt from last chapter of Dark Side of the Army:

Before I detail my vision for another veteran organization, I believe it is first necessary to highlight the unique problems facing our veterans, and secondly, to paint a broad picture of the current available veteran services in order to contrast why our organization, VR&R, is unique and needed.
Read more

Silent Battles


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Battling PTSD
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Battling PTSD

Healthcare Intel: Update involving VA and Veteran’s alternative medicine/healthcare


Liveleak/ NORML update on Veteran’s Federal healthcare

So, Senate has passed the ratification/compromise between 2 programs and immediate implementation of FY2016 Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Bill; this means that anyone in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington can consult with Their VA provider/clinician about alternative medicines/treatments.  Well over a million Veterans are about to have a potentially positively life-changing choice in the next few months; the option to try a plant, a medicine, that may help with proper coping techniques and therapy to overcome the obstacles of living in the Civilian world with that “understanding divide” omnipresent with PTSD and other qualms.  The choice that a plant can provide the same, and much more powerful more often medicinal suppression qualities the likes of Zofran (Ondansetron), Compozine (Prochlorperidol), Clonazepam, Amitryptiline, Seroquil Quitiepine, and so on without crazy side-effects (or potential of death) is literally amazing, and scientifically validated.

This is not obviously for everyone, but the fact that the option is there and that it is finally being recognized as a Federal standard to increase options and quality of care is astounding, and in my eyes a big step in the right direction for all generations of Veterans, and those to come.  From my education background and field experience, I can say that taking the option of this (and associative) plant out of criminal hands (not that it should have been an option for them to exploit in the first place) is the secondarily most-wise thing State governments could do on their own powers granted by the Constitution/Bill of Rights.  I wholly hope that my brothers and sisters in eligible places will heal better and faster with this new quantity of options.  It will be interesting to see the partnership (if any) that develops between independent care centers and the VA.

Student creates app for vets to prevent night terrors


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Renee Tessman, KARE-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul Tyler Skluzacek developed an app that helps vets battle PTSD. The app tracks heart rate and movement to ultimately predict night terrors.

SAINT PAUL, Minn. — A college student, inspired by his Iraq War vet father’s struggles with night terrors, is being recognized for an invention to help those suffering from the condition.

Macalester College senior Tyler Skluzacek said he was in sixth grade when his dad, Sgt. 1st Class Patrick Skluzacek, spent a year in Iraq.
Read more