Watch “Rolling Thunder – A Marine’s Vigil”


I’ve shared this video every Memorial Day that Maiden on the Midway has been online. It’s well worth the 2 1/2 minutes. Have a safe holiday weekend.

Wife Finds Disabled Vet in Tears, Then Sees Shocking Thing Neighbor Did to [for] Him


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  A U.S. Army specialist had deployed to Afghanistan with the 10th Mountain Division when he suffered a grievous wound that brought his military career to an end.  Former combat engineer Christopher Garrett had been shot in the gut while taking part in a night mission, ultimately earning a medical retirement and 100 percent disabled rating. Despite the nagging pain from the injury, the disabled veteran still did his best to maintain his home, including mowing his yard once or twice a week with an old-fashioned push mower.
Read more

Image of the Day: 28 May 2016


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US Army

US Army stationed in our northern most state of Alaska!

See more of these great images at foxtrotalpha.com

The Story of the Poppy

We remember, Memorial Day 2016

The story of the poppy

As Americans kick off  the unofficial start  of summer I’d like to ask everyone reading this to remember why we “celebrate” at the end of May every year. 

Enjoy your long weekend!  Be  safe, be happy.

 

Semper Fi Grandpa, Denver, & Michael. ~A 

VA begins awarding compensation for C-123 agent orange claims

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In 1997, 10 years after retiring from a 34-year career in the Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve, Edward Kosakoski was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Though his last assignment in the Reserve was as commander of the 74th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron at Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts, it was during the mid-1970s and early 1980s that Lt. Col. K was exposed to Agent Orange while flying training missions on several C-123 aircraft previously used for spraying the chemical defoliant in Vietnam. Read more

Image of the Day: 24 May 2016


Not only did American and  Allied forces have to contend with an enemy they couldn’t see in a foreign land (foreign in every aspect), along with the mud, rain, mosquitoes et al, they had to keep their heads on pivot for these giant cats! I personally don’t agree with  this type of hunting for “sport.” But as we know all’s fair in love and war;  when the only  options  were  to kill or be killed, the hunter had to become  the hunted. 

Thank you to all of our Vietnam vets. Rawr!

How To Survive The First 4 Weeks Of Marine Boot Camp

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A drill instructor walks us through the first four weeks of Marine Corps boot camp.

Get off my bus right now!

This is how Marine Corps recruit training, or boot camp, begins. Some guy you’ve never met, wearing a wide-brimmed hat, screams at you to get off the bus. You file out and stand on the yellow footprints, a right of passage for all future Marines, and a reminder that every one of the Corps’ heroes and legends stood where you’re standing. (be sure to watch the video below)!  Read more

Image of the Day:24 May 2016


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Incoming

Helo incoming 

10 Phrases That Make No Sense Outside Of The Army

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These phrases sound pretty funny to people outside the military.
The U.S. Army is often viewed as a no-nonsense organization, as it should be, given the awesome responsibility that lies with its members to protect and defend the people of the United States. As such, military jargon usually reflects this, which words such as, “Roger,” “Affirmative,” and “Execute.” These all conjure up images of hard-bitten soldiers giving orders in combat or communicating vital issues over the radio. And for the most part, this image of a professional organization is exactly correct.

However, as those who have served know, there are a whole multitude of sayings that fit just as well on a kindergarden playground as they do in a military formation, if not better. These sayings are used by privates on up through senior officers and noncommissioned officers. Most of us have gotten so used to them that we don’t blink an eye when we hear them, but to the uninitiated, they sound ludicrous. Here are 10 sayings that make Army soldiers sound like 10-year-olds.

1. “Nut to Butt”

This is usually first heard in basic training, as recruits are ordered to stand in a single file line together, quite close. It derives from the human anatomy and I feel like you get the picture from there.

2. “Licky” and “Chewy”

This one defies logic, especially when heard from senior leaders. It refers to snacks, candy, or other small comforts that soldiers bring with them during field training. As in, “Men, we’ve got a 10-day field training exercise coming up, so make sure you bring all your lickies and chewies.”

3. “Smoking and joking”

There has to be some correlation between Army and Cockney slang, since so many phrases in both cultures are built around rhymes. This phrase refers to a group of soldiers standing around doing nothing particularly useful. They may not even be smoking and/or joking, but the phrase is still used: “We’ve got a busy day, so make sure the troops aren’t standing around smoking and joking when the commander walks through.”

4. “11 Bang Bang”

The infantry branch is often maligned for a perceived lack of intelligence among its members by those of other branches. While this has not been proven, they certainly don’t help their case by referring to themselves as “11 Bang Bangs.” This is derived from their alpha-numeric military occupational specialty code of 11B: “Yeah, I was in the Army, I was an 11 Bang-Bang.”

5. “Boomstick”

Most people would be content with calling a firearm by what it is: rifle, shotgun, machine gun, or pistol. But no, in the Army, we have to give special names that sound like they come from a 4-year-old. Ergo, the boomstick, most usually a name for a rifle or shotgun: “We’ve got a door to breach, grab your boomstick and come with me.”

6. “Onesie twosie”

I have actually caught myself saying this and then realizing I sounded absolutely silly. It refers to one or two soldiers, usually in a negative capacity: “We’ve got medical appointments today, and I want the whole platoon there on time, not coming in onesie twosie.”

7. “Green Weenie”

Far more descriptive than I care to detail. It refers to soldiers’ love/hate relationship with the Army. When the Army does something that they do not care for or that negatively impacts them, soldiers blame the Green Weenie: “I just got transferred to Fort Sill; man, got screwed by the Green Weenie again.”

8. “Lottie, dottie, everybody”

This is the opposite of onesie twosie, and equally laughable. It means, well, everyone. For example: “We’re having mandatory drug testing today, and that means lottie, dottie, and everybody will be there.”

9. “Lost in the sauce”

Even the most professional organization is going to have some slow learners. This saying describes those soldiers who are slow on the uptake or just cannot function in their job: “I saw Carl over in 2nd Platoon, and man, is that guy lost in the sauce.”

10. “Hooah”

This is my least favorite term in the Army, for the simple reason that a whole bunch of grown men and women making this noise sounds neither intimidating or professional. It can be used for anything: showing motivation, demonstrating that you understand, or most commonly, that you have no idea what was just said, but that you want to look like you did: “So what we’re going to do is leverage the staff to bring about a synergistic environment in order to create a product that is perfectly fungible.” “Hooah.”

Source

ARMED FORCES DAY

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Armed Forces Day is a day to pay tribute to the men and women who serve the United States Armed Forces. Armed Forces Day, which is celebrated on the third Saturday in May, is part of Armed Forces Week.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #ArmedForcesDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

It was with the idea for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country that President Harry S. Truman led the effort to establish this single holiday. The one-day celebration then stemmed from the unification of the Armed Forces under the Department of Defense. It was on August 31, 1949, that Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the creation of an Armed Forces Day to replace separate Army, Navy, Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard and Air Force Days.

Read more here 

Structure of the US Army


Structure of the US Army

Image of the Day: 19 May 2016

USS Ronald Reagan at Sea

USS Ronald Reagan at Sea

USS Ronald Reagan at Sea

Image found here

 

Armed Forces Day 2016

Armed Forces Day 2016

President Harry S. Truman led the effort to establish a single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.

On August 31, 1949, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the creation of an Armed Forces Day to replace separate Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force Days.
The single day celebration stemmed from the unification of the Armed Forces under the Department of Defense.

To download this poster, go to the DoD ‘s website and choose your preferred  format. 

http://afd.defense.gov

Warfare & the Spirit of the Soldier

War, Korea

“Many will argue that there is nothing remotely spiritual in combat. Consider this. Mystical or religious experiences have four common components: constant awareness of one’s own inevitable death, total focus on the present moment, the valuing of other people’s lives above one’s own, and being part of a larger religious community such as the Sangha, ummah, or church. All four of these exist in combat. The big difference is that the mystic sees heaven and the warrior sees hell. Whether combat is the dark side of the same version, or only something equivalent in intensity, I simply don’t know. I do know that at the age of fifteen I had a mystical experience that scared the hell out of me and both it and combat put me into a different relationship with ordinary life and eternity.
Most of us, including me, would prefer to think of a sacred space as some light-filled wonderous place where we can feel good and find a way to shore up our psyches against death. We don’t want to think that something as ugly and brutal as combat could be involved in any way with the spiritual….
[However] everything is touched by the holy when it is in the presence of death.”
-Karl Marlantes

Image of the Day: 17 May 2016


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US Army

A competitor heads toward the next event after finishing a 10-kilometer foot march at the 2016 U.S. Army Reserve Best Warrior Competition at Fort Bragg, N.C., May 4, 2016. This year’s Best Warrior Competition determines the top noncommissioned officer and junior enlisted Soldier who will represent the U.S. Army Reserve in the Department of the Army Best Warrior Competition later this year.
(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Tynisha L. Daniel) #USArmy #veterans #USA