The Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall: Photogallery


click images to launch slide show and captions. Enjoy!

To see the rest of this photo essay, click here to visit time.com 

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Picture of the Week: ?


THERE WAS ONE VOTE THIS WEEK FROM THE GALLERY “BATTLEFIELD ART”–MY VOTE– I CAN’T CHOSE THE IMAGE  DUE TO BIAS. (I VOTED FOR MY FRIEND’S, OF COURSE).  I THINK THEY’RE ALL  WORTHY OF RECOGNITION, BUT I’M UNABLE TO FEATURE ONE AS A WINNER. 

Below are two of the images I was going to post in this weeks gallery, ‘Afghanistan.’ I’ll share the rest another time.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Robbins, of t...one

U.S. Army soldiers fire mortar rounds at suspe...two

Click image to launch slide show and full captions. Use the form to vote below

 

 

 

NURISTAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan -- A U.S. Army Soldier calls for an airstrike on the hills surrounding Barge Matal, during Operation Mountain Fire in Afghanistan’s eastern Nuristan province, July 12.Last weeks winner was # 4. Captioned: NURISTAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan — A U.S. Army Soldier calls for an airstrike on the hills surrounding Barge Matal, during Operation Mountain Fire in Afghanistan’s eastern Nuristan province, July 12.

 

Picture of the Week: Battlefield Art


Hello all, Happy Sunday.  The featured image above (must view original post). received the most votes in last weeks FULLY ENGAGED gallery. I’ll feature the  winner of the previous weeks vote  this way every week. (Sun.)

Below are this weeks choices. My original plan was to post a gallery of WWII images but  I’ve shared so many this week already. Instead, I’ve decided to go on the hunt for Soldier’s Battlefield Art .  Their art–like their  war stories–are unique to that individual Soldier’s experiences.  (One of the artists is a friend of mine). Vote for your favorite. (Remember to come back every day to vote again). Enjoy

Click image to launch slide show and full captions. Use the form to vote below

THERE WAS ONE VOTE THIS WEEK; MINE.  I CAN’T CHOSE THE IMAGE AS THE WINNER DUE TO BIAS.  I THOUGHT ALL OF THESE WERE WORTHY OF RECOGNITION, BUT I’M UNABLE TO FEATURE ANY OF THEM.  😦
NURISTAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan -- A U.S. Army Soldier calls for an airstrike on the hills surrounding Barge Matal, during Operation Mountain Fire in Afghanistan’s eastern Nuristan province, July 12.Last weeks winner was # 4. Captioned: NURISTAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan — A U.S. Army Soldier calls for an airstrike on the hills surrounding Barge Matal, during Operation Mountain Fire in Afghanistan’s eastern Nuristan province, July 12.

Picture of the Week: Fully Engaged


Hello all, Happy Sunday. Time to vote for your favorite image.  (BELOW)  This week, NATO photographers caught my attention with these images of US troops “fully engaged.” In each shot, something was occurring, just did, or was about to–without reading the caption it’s clear–It’s written on their faces.  I’ll feature the  winner here every week. (Sun.)

Below are this weeks choices, so  vote for your favorite. (Remember to come back every day to vote again). Enjoy

Click image to launch slide show and full captions 

This weeks winner was # 4 and will be posted on 7 June 2014! Thanks for voting

Picture of the Week: Sailors


Hello all, Happy Saturday. Well, you voted and the results are in.  The image above was voted pic of the week & is from the  gallery, “Brotherhood.”  🙂 Thanks for voting! 

Below are this weeks choices, so have a look and vote for your favorite. (Remember to come back every day to vote again). Enjoy.

Click image to launch slide show

 

 

Picture of the Week


Hello all, Happy Saturday. Well, you voted and the results are in.  The featured image above got the most votes last week so its’ this weeks  pic of the week 🙂   I’ll feature the  winner here every week. Thanks for voting! 

Below are this weeks choices, so have a look and vote for your favorite. (Remember to come back every day to vote again). Enjoy

Click image to launch slide show

 

 

 

Pick Your Pic


This is a great way for me to post the images I’ve  collected.  I’m a History and image geek, combine that with a Pinterest.com account and full speed ahead for me! My History board (pinterest) has grown to over 1,600 images alone–this doesn’t include my military or Navy boards, either. I have some from early American history all the way to our global presence and influences toady. So keep voting for your favorites & I’ll keep them coming, Enjoy!    😀

for the highest resolution, click image to launch  slide show.

These Photos Show Why Britain’s Small Military Is So Powerful


By:   JAN. 6, 2014 
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A British soldier launches a Desert Hawk UAV in Kenya.
british soldier desert hawkUK Ministry of Defence on www.flickr.com
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Despite having a relatively small military (ranking 29th in active personnel), Great Britain is undoubtedly one of the most powerful countries in the world.

The British Armed Forces are battle-tested, well-trained, and technologically advanced.

We looked through the UK’s Ministry Of Defence Flickr page to find some stunning photos of missions, trainings, and the life of the British soldier. Read more

Got Your 6


 

Full Metal Jacket gallery


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For fun 🙂

Full Metal Jacket

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These are all gif images. Click on the picture to go to view the media file.

WWII Propaganda posters


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WW II B 17 Survival Story gallery


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B-17 “All American” (414th Squadron, 97BG) Crew

Pilot- Ken Bragg Jr.
Copilot- G. Boyd Jr.
Navigator- Harry C. Nuessle
Bombardier- Ralph Burbridge
Engineer- Joe C. James
Radio Operator- Paul A. Galloway
Ball Turret Gunner- Elton Conda
Waist Gunner- Michael Zuk
Tail Gunner- Sam T. Sarpolus
Ground Crew Chief- Hank Hyland

In 1943 a mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, between a B-17 and a German fighter over the
Tunis dock area, became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of WW II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went out of control, probably with a wounded pilot, then continued its crashing descent into the rear of the fuselage of a Fortress named “All American”, piloted by Lt. Kendrick R. Bragg, of the 414th Bomb Squadron. When it struck, the fighter broke apart, but left some pieces in the B-17. The left horizontal stabilizer of the Fortress and left elevator were completely torn away. The two right engines were out and one on the left had a serious oil pump leak. The vertical fin and the rudder had been damaged, the fuselage had been cut almost completely through connected only at two small parts of the frame, and the radios, electrical and oxygen systems were damaged. There was also a hole in the top that was over 16 feet long and 4 feet wide at its widest;
the split in the fuselage went all the way to the top gunner’s turret.

Although the tail actually bounced and swayed in the wind and twisted when the plane turned and all the control cables were severed, except one single elevator cable still worked, and the aircraft miraculously still flew!

The tail gunner was trapped because there was no floor connecting the tail to the rest of the plane. The waist and tail gunners used parts of the German fighter and their own parachute harnesses in an attempt to keep the tail from ripping off and the two sides of the fuselage from splitting apart.

While the crew was trying to keep the bomber from coming apart, the pilot continued on his bomb run and released his bombs over the target.

When the bomb bay doors were opened, the wind turbulence was so great that it blew one of the waist gunners into the broken tail section. It took several minutes and four crew members to pass him ropes from parachutes and haul him back into the forward part of the plane. When they tried to do the same for the tail gunner, the tail began flapping so hard that it began to break off. The weight of the gunner was adding some stability to the tail section, so he went back to his position.  The turn back toward England had to be very slow to keep the tail from twisting off. They actually covered almost 70 miles to make the turn home. The bomber was so badly damaged that it was losing altitude and speed and was soon alone in the sky.

For a brief time, two more Me-109 German fighters attacked the All American. Despite the extensive damage, all of the machine gunners were able to respond to these attacks and soon drove off the fighters. The two waist gunners stood up with their heads sticking out through the hole in the top of the fuselage to aim and fire their machine guns. The tail gunner had to shoot in short bursts because the recoil was actually causing the plane to turn. 

Allied P-51 fighters intercepted the All American as it crossed over the Channel and took one of the pictures shown. They also radioed to the base describing that the appendage was waving like a fish tail and that the plane would not make it and to send out boats to rescue the crew when they bailed out.

The fighters stayed with the Fortress, taking hand signals from Lt. Bragg and relaying them to the base. Lt. Bragg signaled that 5 parachutes and the spare had been “used” so five of the crew could not bail out. He made the decision that if they could not bail out safely, then he would stay with the plane to land it. 

Two and a half hours after being hit, the aircraft made its final turn to line up with the runway while it was still over 40 miles away. It descended into an emergency landing and a normal roll-out on its landing gear.

When the ambulance pulled alongside, it was waved off because not a single member of the crew had been injured. No one could believe that the aircraft could still fly in such a condition. The Fortress sat placidly until the crew all exited through the door in the fuselage and the tail gunner had climbed down a ladder, at which time the entire rear section of the aircraft collapsed. 

This old bird had done its job and brought the entire crew home uninjured.

Happy endings and war stories don’t usually go hand in hand but I love when they happen to meet. 🙂

SOURCE: USMC Veteran, via email


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Watchcap kitty-cat

Watchcap–Kitty cat

Corpsman in Angish


Catherine Leroy 1967

 Wike has two hands on his friends chest, trying to staunch the wound

listens for a heartbeat-- Hill 881

Corpsman in Anguish 1967

Catherine was brought up in a convent in Paris. She was moved by images of war she had seen in Paris Match, and decided she wanted to travel to Vietnam to “give war a human face.” At the age of 21 booked a one way ticket to Laos in 1966, with just one Leica M2 and $100 in her pocket.

On arrival in Saigon Leroy met the photographer Horst Faas, bureau chief of the Associated Press. A year later she became the first accredited journalist to participate in a combat parachute jump, joining the 173d Airborne Brigade in Operation Junction City. Two weeks after the battle for Hill 881, she was wounded with a Marine unit near the In 1968, during the Tet Offensive, Leroy was captured by the North Vietnamese Army. She managed to talk her way out and emerged as the first newsperson to take photos of North Vietnamese Army Regulars behind their own lines. The story made the cover of Life Magazine.

Her most famous photo, Corpsman In Anguish, (1967) was one of three taken in quick succession portraying U.S. Navy Corpsman Vernon Wike. In the pictures the sailor is crouched in tall grass during the battle for Hill 881 near Khe Sanh. He is cradling his comrade who has been shot while smoke from the battle rises into the air behind them. In the first frame Wike has two hands on his friends chest, trying to staunch the wound. In the second, he is trying to find a heartbeat. In the third frame, “Corpsman In Anguish”, he has just realised the man is dead.

Catherine, who went to Vietnam in 1965 at the age of 21 with no experience and transformed herself into one of the most accomplished war photographers of her generation, was a role-model and friend to many at Contact. Her images from conflicts in Southeast Asia, Lebanon, and Iran made her internationally famous, but on a more personal level she was unforgettable: slight but tough, abrasive but funny, she “contained multitudes.” For the last several years, in the midst of a new global conflagration, she made it her business to tirelessly gain exposure for the work and lessons she and her colleagues had brought back from Vietnam — a task in which she was often frustrated, but never defeated.

Woodstock Festival 1969


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