[No] Shots Fired!


Cpl. Desmond T. Does

Seventh-Day Adventist Saved Fellow Soldiers on Sabbath

What do you do with a soldier who doesn’t eat meat, refuses to train on Saturday, and won’t carry a gun or bayonet? In the case of Cpl. Desmond T. Doss, you give that soldier a Medal of Honor — and many thanks for saving over 75 lives. Read more

Image of the Day: 16 April 2016


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WWII

The Battle of Cape Gloucester was a battle in the Pacific theater of World War II between Japanese and Allied forces which took place on the island of New Britain, Territory of New Guinea, between late December 1943 and April 1944. The battle was a major part of Operation Cartwheel, the main Allied strategy in the South West Pacific Area and Pacific Ocean Areas during 1943–44, and was the second World War II landing of the U.S. 1st Marine Division, after Guadalcanal

Image of the Day: 1 February 2016


A Japanese plane is shot down during the Battle of Saipan in 1944.

Americans Secure Guadalcanal: 1943


On this day in 1943, Japanese troops evacuate Guadalcanal, leaving the island in Allied possession after a prolonged campaign. The American victory paved the way for other Allied wins in the Solomon Islands. Read more

Today In History, 1999: Panama Canal turned over to Panama


On this day in 1999, the United States, in accordance with the Torrijos-Carter Treaties, officially hands over control of the Panama Canal, putting the strategic waterway into Panamanian hands for the first time. Crowds of Panamanians celebrated the transfer of the 50-mile canal, which links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and officially opened when the SS Arcon sailed through on August 15, 1914. Since then, over 922,000 ships have used the canal.

Interest in finding a shortcut from the Atlantic to the Pacific originated with explorers in Central America in the early 1500s. In 1523, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V commissioned a survey of the Isthmus of Panama and several plans for a canal were produced, but none ever implemented. U.S. interest in building a canal was sparked with the expansion of the American West and the California gold rush in 1848. (Today, a ship heading from New York to San Francisco can save about 7,800 miles by taking the Panama Canal rather than sailing around South America.) Read more