Carrier Woes


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This story caught my eye. It was rated #3 in the Top Stories  of 2013: U.S. Navy Operations. USNI News polled its writers, naval analysts, and service members on what they consider the most important military and maritime stories in 2013. Link to the other top stories of 2013 here. 

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As a result of funding interruptions from the budget battles in Congress, the Navy reduced its carrier presence in the Middle East, delayed deployment of the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), and the refueling of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).

The shift placed pressure on the crew of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on almost back-to-back deployments with just a two-month breather in between.

The image of five carriers pierside at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., was among the most iconic images of the sequestration and continuing resolution budget struggles for the Pentagon.

The budget deal reached by Congress plans to allay some of the operational snags in carrier deployments, but it is unclear if Navy will plus-up carrier presence in the Middle East to its 2012 levels.

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“They are more to me than life, these voices, they are more than motherliness and more than fear; they are the strongest, most comforting thing there is anywhere: they are the voices of my comrades.”
― Erich Maria RemarqueAll Quiet on the Western Front

 

Help a brother out

 

“I am no longer a shuddering speck of existence, alone in the darkness;–I belong to them and they to me; we all share the same fear and the same life…I could bury my face in them, in these voices, these words that have saved me and will stand by me.”
― Erich Maria RemarqueAll Quiet on the Western Front

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USS Nimitz Dry Dock – Episode 3


Meet USS Nimitz Sailors and Puget Sound Naval Shipyard workers as they go through a major evolution in a ship’s life. This is a story of steel, but more important of the men and women making it all happen. This documentary is produced, written and edited entirely by Nimitz Sailors.

Mid-week-MILspeak: U.S. Navy slang


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Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.  Funny Military Pictures (10)  Physical and moral courage and the confidence they create are essential warrior virtues. But God—or the first sergeant—help the fake macho and especially the “REMF,” “fobbit,” or “suit” who talks the talk but hasn’t walked the walk.

 **NOTE: There are terms in these lists that could be considered NSFW.

   

  •     Abu Dhabi (used attributively / as an adjective): Labeled in Arabic aboard a ship; used of any product, but especially soda cans. “We’ve been home from cruise for 8 months and we still have Abu Dhabi Cokes in the vending machines!” (More common synonym: Hadji.)

  • Acey-Deucey Club: A recreational facility that serves alcohol for first and second class petty officers, or any Enlisted Club that caters mostly to First and Second Class Petty Officers, but still allows all enlisted personnel. Read more

Dec 26, 1820: Moses Austin asks Spanish for Texas colony


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Hoping to recover from bankruptcy with a bold scheme of colonization, Moses Austin meets with Spanish authorities in San Antonio to ask permission for 300 Anglo-American families to settle in Texas.

A native of Durham, Connecticut, Austin had been a successful merchant in Philadelphia Moses Austinand Virginia. After hearing reports of rich lead mines in the Spanish-controlled regions to the west, Austin obtained permission in 1798 from the Spanish to mine land in an area that lies in what is now the state of Missouri. Austin quickly built a lead mine, smelter, and town on his property, and his mine turned a steady profit for more than a decade. Unfortunately, the economic collapse following the War of 1812 destroyed the lead market and left him bankrupt.

Determined to rebuild his fortune, Austin decided to draw on his experience with the Spanish and try to establish an American colony in Texas. In 1820, he traveled to San Antonio to request a land grant from the Spanish governor, who initially turned him down. Austin persisted and was finally granted permission to settle 300 Anglo families on 200,000 acres of Texas land. Read more