Out of Bounds


 

screamingmarinegif

The Story Behind This Picture? Well, it would seem that the player #84 was running towards the sidelines AND the USMC Gunnery Sergeant…the player for some reason was shaking his head “no.” The Marine took it personally and his reaction to ANYONE telling him “no” is seen here.  🙂 Gotta love our Marines, Hoorah!  

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Navy Names First Woman to Four-Star Admiral Post


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President Obama nominated Vice Admiral Michelle Howard for a fourth star Friday, becoming the first woman in Navy history to attain the rank—assuming Senate approval—of full admiral.She currently serves as deputy chief of naval operations for operations, plans, and strategy. She has been tapped to serve as vice chief of naval operations, the Navy’s second-ranking officer, and a single step below the chief of naval operations, the service’s top officer.“Someday, sure, there’ll be a woman CNO,” she presciently told Time nearly 14 years ago, when she was commanding the USS Rushmore, an amphibious dock landing ship, out of San Diego. “It will happen of its own accord.”Howard steps up during a demanding time for the Navy, trying to pivot to the Pacific amid a funding crunch that has the service scrambling. “The best ambassador,” she likes to say, “is a warship. Read more

Coins on Gravestones


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While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.

These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America’s military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier’s family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.

A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the solider when he was killed. Read more


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Never Forget

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Never Forget

The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course


In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren’t of much use when it came to running a country.

CNO Army Navy Spirit Video


Who are you rootin’ for?

2013 spirit video from Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Go Navy, Beat Army!

Army vs. Navy


Army vs. Navy

Guess what day it is?

CNO Army Navy Spirit Video


Who are you rooting for? I’m going to remain impartial and not reveal the team I want to win. 😉

Today in History 1799-First U.S. President George Washington dies


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On this day in 1799, George Washington, the man described by fellow soldier and Virginian Henry Lee as “first in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen” dies at his Mount Vernon estate in VirginiaBorn in Westmoreland County, Virginia, the second son from the second marriage of a colonial plantation owner, Washington rose to eminence on his own merit. His first job at age 17 was as a surveyor in the Shenandoah Valley. In 1752, he joined the British army and served as a lieutenant in the French and Indian War. When the war ended, Washington left the army and returned home to Virginia to manage Mount Vernon, the plantation he had recently inherited upon the death of his older brother. He married a wealthy widow, Martha Dandridge Custis, in 1759. Although the couple had no children, Washington adopted Martha’s son and daughter from her previous marriage. While in Virginia, Washington served in the colonial House of Burgesses and, like many of his compatriots, grew increasingly frustrated with colonial rule by the British government. He soon joined his co-revolutionaries in the Continental Congress.

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   “Lady Anna, taking lives never bothered me and I never was troubled by what I had to do. Tis the guilt of living when so many with more to lose, died. They are the faces that haunt me….no chance to say last words to loved ones. I did what I could by writing their families but it was a job and never enough, so I would sometimes mention things they had said about a wife and child, not about how they died beside me.”
–L. Legion Vietnam veteran

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