Snipers Deadliest Missions Pt. 3


.

.

Part 3 of the History Channel’s Documentary
Snipers Deadliest Missions

.

I challenge you to read this and NOT have the will to pass it on


.

This article was shared with me earlier by a veteran in on G+.  I read this young man’s story earlier this year and wanted to share this article with you. (I will find the back story and share it as well)

I hear stories about the hardship our vets are going through, some first hand from veterans who are not getting the medical treatment they desperately need. (there are some who have gone without since the war in Iraq. (Gulf War Illness). Not only does this break my heart, it is UNACCEPTABLE.  

As Americans I feel it’s our duty to speak up for our vets; make a little noise Promise them and our representatives that we won’t quiet down until issues are addressed. You can find your congressmen/senator contact info on my resource  page and this.  Thank you. Continue this article via the link below.

   No one has been able to explain to me why young men and women serve in the U.S. Military for 20 years, risking their lives protecting freedom, and only get 50% of their pay on retirement.  While Politicians hold their political positions in the safe confines of the capital, protected by these same men and women, and receive full-pay retirement after serving one term. It just does not make any sense.If each person who receives this will forward it on to 20 people, in three days, most people in The United States of America will have the message. This is one proposal that really should be passed around… Read more


.

A sketch of Marines during their downtime on a deployment.

U.S. Marine Corps illustration by Sgt. Shawn P. Sales

.

First There…So Others May Live-USAF Tactics


.

.

A documentary covering the history of USAF Special tactics (2nd Place-Documentary Category)

.

Monday MIL-speak


 

Waging war is a risky, all-encompassing endeavor physically, emotionally, and psychologically. It displays humankind at its best and at its worst, and the war fighter’s slang reflects the bitter, terrible, and inspiring all of it. A quick scan of these phrases illustrates the spectrum: disciplined bravado provides the glitz and glamour; earned camaraderie, the sincerity and warmth; irony, the realist’s edge; scorn, the punishing barb; and insistent vulgarity, a rowdy,leveling earthiness. A little verbal bravado and swagger has genuine utility. Hollywood bravado is little more than chest thumping bluster, but seasoned vets know that disciplined bravado indicates confidence and courage.  Funny Military Pictures (10)  Physical and moral courage and the confidence they create are essential warrior virtues. But God—or the first sergeant—help the fake macho and especially the “REMF,” “fobbit,” or “suit” who talks the talk but hasn’t walked the walk.

 **NOTE: There are terms in these lists that could be considered NSFW.

   

  1. B1A (U.S.) Army, Vietnam-era. used to describe a C-ration B1A unit, the most highly prized meal of that genre, due to it containing a can of fruit salad in syrup. Pronounced, “Bee-one-A”.
  2. Bag (Canada) Term used to denote the uselessness of a soldier, as in a “bag of hammers” or “bag of shit”. U.S. Slang for the flight suit worn by aircrew members.
  3. Bag nasty (U.S.) The name given to the fast food options in chow halls, i.e.; hot dogs and hamburgers. Also common reference for MREs. In the Air Force, commonly a reference to pre-packed Flight Lunches intended for aircrew or personnel whose duties do not allow them to go to the chow hall to eat their meals.
  4. Bag of dicks (U.S.) A problematic or intractable situation.
  5. Bag of smashed asshole (U.S.) Highly derogatory, typically used to describe a soldier whose uniform wear is unsatisfactory, as in \”Private Smith, you look like a bag of smashed asshole\”. Can also be used in a more general sense to describe anything that is heavily damaged or poor in appearance.
  6. Bagger (IRL) derogatory term referring to an Irish reservist Soldier, comparing him/her to a sandbag, i.e.; useless.
  7. Balls (U.S.) Term for midnight on a 24-hour clock since it looks like four balls 0000, \”My watch is from balls to eight\”.
  8. Balls to the walls (U.S.) Cornered, back against the wall; a desperate situation. More, commonly, to go as fast as possible.
  9. Balls to nutsack (Canada) Describes troops cramped together closely
  10. BAM (U.S.) Broad Assed Marine. Derogatory term for a female Marine.
  11. Bang stick (Canada) C7 rifle or any other rifle
  12. Barracks rat (U.S.) A servicemember unwilling or financially unable to go “out in town” during liberty. (Canada) Servicewoman who engages in sexual relations with others in a housing area
  13. Battle Bowler (U.K.) Commonwealth Steel helmet
  14. Bayonet U.S. (Civil War-WW1) Infantryman
  15. BCGs (U.S.) Birth Control Glasses. Military issued eyeglasses, typically first issued in basic training, noted for their unappealing appearance which would prevent attracting members of the opposite sex.
  16. Beagle (U.S.) Air Force F-15E Fighter/Bomber. Contraction of “Bomber-Eagle
  17. Beam Rider (U.S.) An A-10 Thunderbolt or similar aircraft that uses laser guided missiles or other laser guided rounds to destroy objects.
  18. Beans and bullets (U.S.) The general term for all types of supplies.
  19. Beat your face (U.S.) Slang for “do some push-ups” and is commonly used in boot camp. Example: “Private, you think thats funny?! BEAT YOUR FACE!”
  20. Benny (U.K.) British Army slang for the Falkland Islands civilians during the Falklands War and locals around bases in the West Country. Based on a badly dressed, mentally retarded character in the soap opera Crossroads.

     blackberries            

                                                                              

                       

                                                             Definition of Zulu Time or GMT 

law-order-girlfriend-mistress-girl_in_every_port-ports-sailors-dpan3387lThe Department of the Navy serves as the country’s official timekeeper,

with the Master Clock facility at the U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, D.C. 

“Zulu” time is that which you might know as “GMT” (Greenwich Mean Time). Our natural concept of time is linked to the rotation of the earth and we define the length of the day as the 24 hours it takes the earth to spin once on its axis.

As time pieces became more accurate and communication became global, there needed to be a point from which all other world times were based. Since Great Britain was the world’s foremost maritime power when the concept of latitude and longitude came to be, the starting point for designating longitude was the “prime meridian” which is zero degrees and runs through the Royal Greenwich Observatory, in Greenwich, England, southeast of central London. As a result, when the concept of time zones was introduced, the “starting” point for calculating the different time zones was/is at the Royal Greenwich Observatory. When it is noon at the observatory, it is five hours earlier (under Standard Time) in Washington, D.C.; six hours earlier in Chicago; seven hours earlier in Denver; and, eight hours earlier in Los Angeles.

.

Snipers Deadliest Missions Pt. 2


.

.

The 2nd video in The History Channel’s Documentary Snipers: Deadliest Missions

 


.

NEW YORK - Marines with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit led a run to Ground Zero, May 31. The majority of Marines with the 24th MEU joined the Marine Corps after the attacks of Sept. 11. More than 3,000 Marines, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen in the area participating in community outreach events and equipment demonstrations as part of Fleet Week New York 2011..

NEW YORK – Marines with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit led a run to Ground Zero, May 31. The majority of Marines with the 24th MEU joined the Marine Corps after the attacks of Sept. 11. More than 3,000 Marines, Sailors and Coast Guardsmen in the area participating in community outreach events and equipment demonstrations as part of Fleet Week New York 2011.

.